Routine Vaccinations
Book Now
Tests & Treatments

Routine Vaccinations

Routine vaccinations provide essential immunisations against common infectious diseases.

1

Suitable For

Immunisation Schedule Adherence
Seasonal Influenza Prevention
Travel Health Prophylaxis
Occupational Health Compliance
School Entry Requirements
Chronic Disease Protection
Herd Immunity Support
Newborn and Infant Care
Elderly Immunisation
High-Risk Group Protection

See More
See Less

Not Suitable For

Severe Allergic Reaction History
Immunocompromise
Live Vaccine Exclusion for Pregnancy
Immunoglobulin Administration Recently
Recent Blood Transfusion
Thymus Disorder
Neurological Reaction History
Vaccine Component Hypersensitivity
Uncontrolled Asthma or Active Eczema
Acute Febrile Illness

See More
See Less

Overview

Routine immunisations are integral to public health, safeguarding individuals and communities from severe diseases.

Key Takeaways

  • Vaccines are the most effective method to prevent infectious diseases and are safe for both children and adults.
  • A range of vaccines are commonly administered throughout childhood and adolescence.
  • Vaccines are also commonly administered to adults, especially those age 65 or older, and specific vaccines may be required for travel to countries where specific infectious diseases are present.
  • Vaccinations work by teaching the immune system to create antibodies, providing often lifelong protection against diseases.
  • Immunisation schedules are standardised to protect high-risk groups and are a crucial element of quality healthcare.
  • Vaccination programs have significantly reduced or nearly eliminated many diseases.
  • It is important to maintain high vaccination coverage to prevent the resurgence of diseases.

Need to Know

What diseases do vaccines protect against?

Vaccines are effective to prevent a wide range of illnesses. For instance, the MMR vaccine povides protection against measles, mumps, and rubella, three diseases that can lead to severe complications such as meningitis, hearing loss, and complications during pregnancy.

When should vaccines be administered?

Vaccines are administered to children and adults according to schedules developed and recommended by national health authorities. For example, The MMR vaccine is typically administered in two doses. The initial dose is given between 12 to 15 months of age, followed by a second dose between 4 to 6 years of age. Other vaccines are administered to children and adolescents through the age of 15, to adults, and to individuals travelling to countries where specific infectious diseases are present.

*Are vaccines effective? *

Yes, most vaccines in common use are highly effective. For example, over 95% of children who receive the MMR vaccine will be protected from measles, mumps, and rubella throughout their lifetime.

Insurance Coverage & Self-Pay

The cost of vaccines may be covered by health insurance plans. Individuals may also pay out of pocket for vaccines. Use Odycy to find expert vaccination services near you and compare prices.

Dr. Nicholas Bush MBBS BSc (Hons)
Editor
Dr. Nicholas Bush MBBS BSc (Hons)
Last Reviewed:
17/4/2024
Published:
17/4/2024

Conclusion

Protect your health with routine vaccinations available near you on Odycy. Find and book essential immunisations for preventing infectious diseases and maintaining health with appointments near you available through Odycy.

Ask your doctor to refer you onto Odycy

Referral Required

Get A Referral

Some services need a referral. Ask your doctor to refer you onto Odycy. You can also upload one or get a referral quickly online or phone:

Discuss Results
Talk To A Doctor

Talk to A Doctor

Book Now

Access Healthcare

Choose more affordable healthcare from the best providers.

30%
Savings through Odycy
500+
Providers
Same Day Appointments
Vaccinations
Routine Vaccinations
Measles and Mumps and Rubella (MMR) Vaccination
One Dose - Requires Two Doses
Needle
Needle
Next
Influenza Vaccination (Flu Jab)
One Dose - Requires One Dose Annually
Needle
Needle
Next
Chickenpox Vaccination
One Dose - Requires Two Doses
Needle
Needle
Next
Meningitis B (MenB) Vaccination
One Dose - Requires Two Doses
Needle
Needle
Next
Hepatitis A & B Combined Vaccination
One Dose - Requires Three Doses
Needle
Needle
Next
Hepatitis B Vaccination
One Dose - Requires Three Doses
Needle
Needle
Next
Shingles Vaccination
One Dose - Requires Two Doses
Needle
Needle
Next
HPV Vaccination
One Dose - Requires Up to Three Doses
Needle
Needle
Next
Whooping Cough Booster for Pregnant Women
DTaP Booster Vaccination
Needle
Needle
Next
COVID-19 (Booster) Vaccination
COVID Vaccination
Needle
Needle
Next
Pneumonia Vaccination
One Dose - Requires One Dose Annually
Needle
Needle
Next
Hepatitis A Vaccination
One Dose - Requires Two Doses
Needle
Needle
Next
BCG Vaccine for TB
Tuberculosis Vaccine
Needle
Needle
Next
Diphtheria and Tetanus and Pertussis Vaccination
DTaP - One Dose - Requires One Dose
Needle
Needle
Next
Men ACWY (Meningitis A C W Y) Vaccination
One Dose - Requires One Dose
Needle
Needle
Next
Td/IPV - Tetanus / Diphtheria / Polio 3-in-1 Vaccination
One Dose - Requires One Dose
Needle
Needle
Next
Tetanus Single / Booster Vaccination
One Dose
Needle
Needle
Next
Diphtheria Single / Booster Vaccination
One Dose
Needle
Needle
Next
Polio Single / Booster Vaccination
One Dose
Needle
Needle
Next
Hepatitis A and Typhoid Combined Vaccination
One Dose - Requires One Dose
Needle
Needle
Next